LOCAL POLITICS

The Bus Should Be Free

The Bus Should Be Free

Mobility is freedom, but just as the slaveholders who founded this country never believed in liberty for all, today too one need only look at a map of Richmond’s bus system to see the limits of many folks’ freedom. Routes that end at the county line and buses that...




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Art & Country: A Sunday Essay

Back in April, I had the great privilege of visiting the Louvre for the first time. The many works in that historic museum exceeded all my expectations and kept me enthralled for the all too short three hours I spent inside. As closing time approached, museum staff...

We want to raise awareness of the situation in Iran with a mural

ed. note: In light of fact checking this morning we have to retract the information presented on our platforms yesterday and clarify that Iran has NOT sentenced 15,000 protestors to the death penalty but the possibly remains they could in the future. We apologize for...

You Beto Work 2: A Bumble Love Letter to Beto O’Rourke

Fall calls for late nights and warm blankets, lost in the small glare of the light from my phone. Tired of endlessly swiping right on the same balding white guy named Jeff holding a spotted bass he is entirely too proud of. Tinder? Never. I’m far higher brow than...

Dissociative Gaze Into The Abyss: A Sunday Essay

Is the revival of the 2014 Tumblr girl how the internet copes with the end of the world?  The dissociative pout, also referred to as the dissociative gaze, was first coined by i-D Magazine in the 2022 article “The cult of the dissociative pout” by Rayne Fisher-Quann,...

Climate Resilience And Justice In Richmond

When I was seven years old, I lived through one of the deadliest weather-related disasters in recent U.S. history.  It was July 1995 and my family lived in the northwestern suburbs of Chicago, IL, in a two-story house on a corner lot with a big, beautiful weeping willow tree and a few purple lilac bushes in the backyard (ironic to me now,...

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Spaces To Breathe

Close your eyes and take a deep breath. Think back to the last time you were outside under the shade of a tree enjoying the breeze, the chirping birds, and the fresh air. Did your shoulders drop? Did some tension leave your body? Did you feel refreshed? If you were like me, and many in the Richmond region, you spent a good amount of time...

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The Trust for Public Land

Radically Reimagining Our Systems

Anyone who has been on the leadership team of a health organization in the past few years can tell you that when it’s time to update your strategic plan or submit a proposal for funding, the word “equity” goes front and center. Organizations across the region (my own included) use “equity” whenever possible: we are equity-driven, have an...

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Incarceration And Violence: Time For A Change

Prison Isn’t Working In her book detailing the work of Common Justice, a New York-based incarceration alternative to violent crime convictions, Danielle Sered writes that there are four core drivers of violence -- shame, isolation, exposure to violence, and a diminished ability to meet one’s economic needs.  Simultaneously, there are four...

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When Black [Girls’] Lives Really Matter

“The most disrespected person in America is the Black woman. The most unprotected person in America is the Black woman. The most neglected person in America is the Black woman.” - Malcolm X This quote by Malcolm X is well known by Black women in my community because it still rings true today. It is also true of Black girls, who grow up to be...

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Intentionally Connecting With The Other

I was only 12 years old when I moved from Guatemala to Virginia with my mom and siblings to reunite with my dad after 10 years. Everything was new to me. I remember coming out of the plane and even noticing that the air smelled different. I felt so far away from home, a stranger in a new land.  As strangers, we have to learn so much about...

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“Si, yo Hablo Español”: Empowering Spanish-speakers with Culturally and Linguistically Accessible Services

Growing up in Miami Florida as a Latina, I never really considered myself a “minority” because of the high population of Latinos and Spanish-speakers living there. Every sign you read and every space you enter is bilingual; that is the norm. So, when I moved to Richmond, I experienced culture shock as I noticed the lack of language diversity...

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The Case For Meaningful Language Access

Through my work in the Richmond area for the last twenty years, I have dedicated my career to welcoming immigrant families, starting at Refugee and Immigration Services, then through the City of Richmond Office of Multicultural Affairs, and for the last five years, through Sacred Heart Center, where we connect Latino families with tools to...

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