ART WHINO : Beautiful Failures w/ Rich Salcido

by | Sep 9, 2010 | ART

Richard Salcido’s work encompasses the process of exhibition development by creating an ‘exhibition-worthy’ piece under a daily time constraint from inception to completion, and embracing the idiosyncratic qualities that unfinished pieces may include. He states that “on certain days some things come together and on other days everything seems to fall apart,” but accepts each as it comes. He rejoices both in success and in failure, and finding a balance between what an artist is expected to put into creating a final piece, and what actually results. Though he often wonders why he paints everyday given he is often left with disappointment, he believes that “there is a beauty in it, because there is a beauty in failing.” Drawing from an early influence in comic books and graffiti, his work features figurative, still life, and typographic elements juxtaposed with mixed media, and deconstructionist appeal, which highlights the various layers of the compositional process that he strives to exemplify within this series. – Art Whino

Megan Laurine: Tell us a bit about yourself; what are you into, what do you like to do outside of the studio?
Richard Salcido: I’m simple. I take pleasure in what to me are the important things, time with family,friends and a daily trip to the beach. If I’m not painting, I’m involved with one of those.

Megan: What do you like most about your work, and what you do as an artist?
Richard: What I like most about my work is It’s honesty. I guess what I like the most about what I do as an artist is that I’m proud of all the work I do but I don’t take pride in myself for doing it.

Megan: What are the first words that come to mind when you are asked to describe your body of work? Why?
Richard: In the past few years when asked what I paint I just say, ‘I paint women”.

Megan: What is it about your painting technique that you enjoy; what inspired you to take that route creatively; what is the process involved?
Richard: I enjoy the entire process from building panels to scratching or sanding up the painting I laid down, but honestly the scratching the work is the most fun. I enjoy that part of the process because the painting is calming and if I don’t like, I can paint over it. Once I gouge into it, there’s no turning back.

Megan: What other genres of art are you find yourself attracted to outside of your own style of work?
Richard: All styles. There’s beauty everywhere.

Megan: Do you draw inspiration from any other artists, past or present?
Richard: Sure, so many. From comic book artist, past and present illustrators, graffiti writers, sculptors, the list is endless and growing daily. The list is long but I’ll give you a few of my favorites past and present. William Bougereau, J. Scott Campbell, Phil Hale, John Singer Sargent. The painting that blew my mind when I was 12 yrs old, ‘Monitor’ by Franz Kline! So simple and complex all at once.

Megan: About your portraits, how do you choose your figures; how do their characters develop; are they based on people you know?
Richard: Many times they are made up faces, some from my mind and some from takinga few faces and creating new face in photoshop. When I choose a “real” person to paint I try to find someone that has some personal strength that I admire. I throw a little bit of my wifes face in every portrait.

Megan: What is the greatest challenge about choosing to represent the figure in fine art?
Richard: I haven’t really found any. I was told by galleries that “people dont sell”, I saw this as a challenge.

Megan: What was your goal with the conception and development of Beautiful Failures?
Richard: The goal was to show work that isn’t necessarily my best. Instead of just digging through a stack of failed paintings I decided to take 25 days to do 25 paintings do the best I could on that day and show them no matter the outcome. Most of the time I set up a timer and when the timer went off I was finished.

Megan: What is something you hope resonates with every viewer who comes out to see your upcoming exhibition?
Richard: I just hope people like it for what it is, a showing of 25 simple paintings.

Megan: What has been your greatest achievement so far as an independent artist?
Richard: Five years without a day job.

Megan: As artists, we all experience the evolution of our work; what do you see yourself doing next?
Richard: I’m not sure, I see small changes in every painting. I’ll let my work go wherever it goes.

Megan: Any shout-outs, words of advice, or general nonsense you’d care to share with our readers?
Richard: My words of advice, just enjoy yourself. Whatever you do.

by Megan Laurine

More work by Rich Salcido at www.richardsalcido.com
Check out DC gallery ART WHINO for more incredible street art.

Saturday, September 18th, from 6pm – Midnight

Sketching Session with live model 6-8pm
Musical Performance starts at 8pm
Complimentary Special Show Cocktail
Brought to you by our friends at Mie N Yu Restaurant

Location: Art Whino Gallery
173 Waterfront St.
National Harbor, MD 20745

Show end date: October 15th
The sketching session begins at 6pm and ends at 8pm and is free. We will have special edition blank sketchbooks for sale at the show as well but you are welcome to bring your own sketchbook.
The event is FREE and open to the public.


Richard Salcido’s work encompasses the process of exhibition development by creating an ‘exhibition-worthy’ piece under a daily time constraint from inception to completion, and embracing the idiosyncratic qualities that unfinished pieces may include. He states that “on certain days some things come together and on other days everything seems to fall apart,” but accepts each as it comes. He rejoices both in success and in failure, and finding a balance between what an artist is expected to put into creating a final piece, and what actually results. Though he often wonders why he paints everyday given he is often left with disappointment, he believes that “there is a beauty in it, because there is a beauty in failing.” Drawing from an early influence in comic books and graffiti, his work features figurative, still life, and typographic elements juxtaposed with mixed media, and deconstructionist appeal, which highlights the various layers of the compositional process that he strives to exemplify within this series. – Art Whino

Megan Laurine: Tell us a bit about yourself; what are you into, what do you like to do outside of the studio?
Richard Salcido: I’m simple. I take pleasure in what to me are the important things, time with family,friends and a daily trip to the beach. If I’m not painting, I’m involved with one of those.

Megan: What do you like most about your work, and what you do as an artist?
Richard: What I like most about my work is It’s honesty. I guess what I like the most about what I do as an artist is that I’m proud of all the work I do but I don’t take pride in myself for doing it.

Megan: What are the first words that come to mind when you are asked to describe your body of work? Why?
Richard: In the past few years when asked what I paint I just say, ‘I paint women”.

Megan: What is it about your painting technique that you enjoy; what inspired you to take that route creatively; what is the process involved?
Richard: I enjoy the entire process from building panels to scratching or sanding up the painting I laid down, but honestly the scratching the work is the most fun. I enjoy that part of the process because the painting is calming and if I don’t like, I can paint over it. Once I gouge into it, there’s no turning back.

Megan: What other genres of art are you find yourself attracted to outside of your own style of work?
Richard: All styles. There’s beauty everywhere.

Megan: Do you draw inspiration from any other artists, past or present?
Richard: Sure, so many. From comic book artist, past and present illustrators, graffiti writers, sculptors, the list is endless and growing daily. The list is long but I’ll give you a few of my favorites past and present. William Bougereau, J. Scott Campbell, Phil Hale, John Singer Sargent. The painting that blew my mind when I was 12 yrs old, ‘Monitor’ by Franz Kline! So simple and complex all at once.

Megan: About your portraits, how do you choose your figures; how do their characters develop; are they based on people you know?
Richard: Many times they are made up faces, some from my mind and some from takinga few faces and creating new face in photoshop. When I choose a “real” person to paint I try to find someone that has some personal strength that I admire. I throw a little bit of my wifes face in every portrait.

Megan: What is the greatest challenge about choosing to represent the figure in fine art?
Richard: I haven’t really found any. I was told by galleries that “people dont sell”, I saw this as a challenge.

Megan: What was your goal with the conception and development of Beautiful Failures?
Richard: The goal was to show work that isn’t necessarily my best. Instead of just digging through a stack of failed paintings I decided to take 25 days to do 25 paintings do the best I could on that day and show them no matter the outcome. Most of the time I set up a timer and when the timer went off I was finished.

Megan: What is something you hope resonates with every viewer who comes out to see your upcoming exhibition?
Richard: I just hope people like it for what it is, a showing of 25 simple paintings.

Megan: What has been your greatest achievement so far as an independent artist?
Richard: Five years without a day job.

Megan: As artists, we all experience the evolution of our work; what do you see yourself doing next?
Richard: I’m not sure, I see small changes in every painting. I’ll let my work go wherever it goes.

Megan: Any shout-outs, words of advice, or general nonsense you’d care to share with our readers?
Richard: My words of advice, just enjoy yourself. Whatever you do.

by Megan Laurine

More work by Rich Salcido at www.richardsalcido.com
Check out DC gallery ART WHINO for more incredible street art.

Saturday, September 18th, from 6pm – Midnight

Sketching Session with live model 6-8pm
Musical Performance starts at 8pm
Complimentary Special Show Cocktail
Brought to you by our friends at Mie N Yu Restaurant

Location: Art Whino Gallery
173 Waterfront St.
National Harbor, MD 20745

Show end date: October 15th
The sketching session begins at 6pm and ends at 8pm and is free. We will have special edition blank sketchbooks for sale at the show as well but you are welcome to bring your own sketchbook.
The event is FREE and open to the public.

R. Anthony Harris

R. Anthony Harris

I created Richmond, Virginia’s culture publication RVA Magazine and brought the first Richmond Mural Project to town. Designed the first brand for the Richmond’s First Fridays Artwalk and promoted the citywide “RVA” brand before the city adopted it as the official moniker. I threw a bunch of parties. Printed a lot of magazines. Met so many fantastic people in the process. Professional work: www.majormajor.me




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