RVA Street Art Fest space/GRTC bus depot one step closer to (temporary) public space

by | Mar 24, 2015 | POLITICS

Richmond City Council voted unanimously Monday night to allow negotiation between the Greater Richmond Transit Company and the city to allow use of the former GRTC bus depot-turned street art space.

Richmond City Council voted unanimously Monday night to allow negotiation between the Greater Richmond Transit Company and the city to allow use of the former GRTC bus depot-turned street art space.

The depot, colloquially known as the “bus barn”, is located at 100 South Davis Avenue north of the Downtown Expressway, at Cary and Robinson.

Councilman Parker Agelasto is the first patron on the resolution. He said that this is a good way to breathe life into the space.

“Right now, its not being used for anything,” Agelasto said. “So how can you bring life back into that area? It’s a huge space and, being dormant, it doesn’t benefit anyone in the neighborhood or in the city.”

The councilman’s district covers the location of the “bus barn,” councilmen Jonathan Baliles and Charles Samuels are co-patrons of the resolution.

Agelasto said the property is still going through steps including environmental testing for the sale of the property. This is a way for the city to make money and open a large space for use until it is sold.

“Right now its not producing any revenue for the city,” Agelasto said. “There’s a short term gain that we could potentially have in terms of using it for festivals, bringing in the the food carts, or making it available for public parking.”

There would be no capital cost to the city, Agelasto said, adding the only operational costs to the city would be the employee who would schedule the property.

“All other resources are brought to bear by the person who will sublet,” Agelasto said.

The resolution simply allows negotiation, so the definitive details of an agreement are yet to be decided, but Agelasto said that the timeline is likely to be short for a final agreement.

“The conversations have been happening prior to even introduction of the resolution,” Agelasto said. “From my knowledge, some of the conversations that have already occurred could net a pretty quick turnaround. I think maybe within the next couple months.”

The only item on the regular agenda was a contested measure to allow the movement of a sewage line closer to the James River.

Despite opposition from many residents of the neighborhood near the property, the resolution passed 8-1. Councilman Agelasto was the sole ‘nay’ vote.

Brad Kutner

Brad Kutner




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